Watch CBS News

These Twin Cities women are using faith, relationships to deal with the mental health struggles of aging

How two women are helping older adults with mental health
How two women are helping older adults with mental health 02:16

MINNEAPOLIS — This May, WCCO is partnering with NAMI Minnesota to spread the important message that mental health matters and there is hope if you are struggling.

Many older adults are using faith as a healing method. WCCO's Adam Duxter introduces us to two women making it happen.

Before their interview with WCCO at Bethlehem Lutheran Church, Susanna Bertelsen and Renee Kumpula hadn't met. But you wouldn't guess it. 

snapshot-7.jpg
Susanna Bertelsen and Renee Kumpula WCCO

"We have more connections than we know," Kumpula said. "We've taught for the same university system, we've both been faith community nurses."

It only makes sense these two women are part of the fight against loneliness, separation and isolation impacting aging adults around them. 

"Those have been a part of the aging experience for decades actually," Kumpula said.

"Developing those relationships is very important as we age," Bertelsen said. "There are just so many life changes as we age."

For Bertelstein, it's personal, after years caring for a brother diagnosed with depression and schizophrenia.

"I would access every resource I could to help my family and to help myself deal with, advocate for my brother," Bertelsen said.

Today, these two are no strangers to the church.  

"The stigma of mental health affects the ability of older adults to have conversations,"  Kumpula said.

Their faith-based nursing is providing support and community. 

"I see that as relationship. Relationship with each other, relationship in a broader community where your values, your beliefs are similar, the same, compatible," Bertelsen said.

With decades of experience healing the body, these two say this is the first step to healing the mind. 

"Walking with mental illness with someone you love is not an independent walk, you must reach out to others," Bertelsen said.

If you or someone you know could use someone to talk to about their mental health, you can call 988 day or night to talk confidentially to a real person trained to help.

View CBS News In
CBS News App Open
Chrome Safari Continue
Be the first to know
Get browser notifications for breaking news, live events, and exclusive reporting.
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news
news